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French Baker Jailed in China for Using Expired Flour

French Baker Jailed in China for Using Expired Flour


Laurent Fortin has been imprisoned since March in an expired flour scandal

French baker Laurent Fortin has been imprisoned in China since March for allegedly using expired flour at the Farine bakery chain.

French baker Laurent Fortin has been imprisoned in China since March, along with six of his coworkers, for allegedly using expired flour at Farine, a chain of trendy French bakeries in Shanghai. Now his family is petitioning the French government to intervene for his release.

Back in March, an alleged former employee of Farine went on social media to post allegations of unhygienic practices and expired flour at the high-end bakery chain. According to Shanghaiist, the whistleblower said the company used expired and even moldy flour to make the bread sold in its stores. Not long after that, the Shanghai Food and Drug Administration launched a sudden investigation and shut down all four Farine stores and confiscated more than 570 bags of expired importd flour from Frace.

Farine issued a statement after that, saying that it had been an innocent communication error. Farine said it had been mistakenly using the “best before” dates provided by the French flour manufacturers, while China requires bakeries to follow stricter expiration dates.

La Farine owner Franck Pecol was in France when that happened, so he was not arrested. He has reportedly not returned to China and is said to still be in France. Seven of his employees were arrested, however, and have been imprisoned and face prosecution. 48-year-old French baker Laurent Fortin was among them, and his family is petitioning the French government to intervene on his behalf.

Fortin’s family says Fortin only started his job in December 2016, so he’d only been working there a few months when he was imprisoned in March 2017.

"We demand the immediate liberation of Laurent as well as the involvement of the French government," Farine’s brother wrote on the Change.org petition for his release.

If Fortin is convicted, he faces between one and 15 years in prison.


11 Amazing Ways to Use Your Sourdough Discard

There’s no getting around it: When you bake sourdough bread, you end up with starter discard. Sometimes, a lot of it. Luckily you can use sourdough discard in recipes here are some favorites.

One traditional way to utilize the stuff is in pancakes or waffles, and some of you even like them for dinner, a phenomenon I have only recently embraced.

I understand I’m in the minority because it seems that everyone else came to love this irrationally timed meal when they were children, but I did not. Even then, it offended my sense of routine and order. Pancakes? At six o’clock AT NIGHT? Ridiculous.

When I became a mom and dinner was, as they say, on my plate, I changed my tune. It didn’t hurt that I had a killer pancake and waffle recipe, made from some of the copious sourdough discard created from my bread obsession.

Which came first, the change of heart or the recipe? Hard to say. Either way, this is a great one, and I often double it and freeze the extras just in case someone wants to eat them at an unconventional time, say, before noon. Or at midnight. Right now, anything goes. Enjoy!

Sourdough Pancakes and Waffles

Makes: About 12 pancakes, 3 inches in diameter or 4-5 waffles, about 8 inches in diameter

INGREDIENTS
  • 2/3 cup (150 g) leftover starter
  • 1 cup (240 ml) milk (whole, 2%, or your choice of nut milk)
  • 2 tablespoons (42 g) melted unsalted butter or melted coconut oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup (120 g) flour – white whole wheat, whole wheat, or all-purpose
  • 1 tablespoon (12 g) sugar (white sugar or coconut sugar)
  • 2 teaspoons (10 g) baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon (5 g) fine sea salt
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Add leftover starter, milk, butter, and egg into a large bowl. Whisk well to combine and then add flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt and whisk to thoroughly combine. You can adjust your batter from here—if it’s too thick, you can add more milk if it seems too runny, you can add a little more flour. This will depend on the consistency of your leftover starter, which may vary from batch to batch. If you like buckwheat, you can even add a little in for extra nutrition and that distinctive flavor.
  2. FOR WAFFLES: Preheat your waffle iron. Spray with cooking spray or brush with additional melted butter. Cook until golden brown, 3-5 minutes. Serve warm with butter, maple syrup, and/or fruit of your choice.
  3. FOR PANCAKES: Preheat a griddle or frying pan and spray with cooking spray or brush with butter. Use 1/3 – ½ c scoops and cook until small bubbles form across each pancake. Add mini chocolate chips (my boys’ favorite style!) or blueberries before flipping over. Cook until golden brown. Serve warm with butter and syrup.

To Freeze: Cool completely on a wire rack and freeze in a single layer.

Other Variations: You can add pumpkin and/or banana puree and cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice mixture to this recipe without changing a thing! Add a generous ½ cup of either or a combination of both. For savory waffles, use malt powder instead of sugar and add shredded cheddar cheese and ½ teaspoon of dried herbs into the batter.

I prefer waffles to pancakes, and I highly recommend you serve them hot off the iron with Chicago Maple Bourbon Barrel Aged Syrup. Trust me on this.


11 Amazing Ways to Use Your Sourdough Discard

There’s no getting around it: When you bake sourdough bread, you end up with starter discard. Sometimes, a lot of it. Luckily you can use sourdough discard in recipes here are some favorites.

One traditional way to utilize the stuff is in pancakes or waffles, and some of you even like them for dinner, a phenomenon I have only recently embraced.

I understand I’m in the minority because it seems that everyone else came to love this irrationally timed meal when they were children, but I did not. Even then, it offended my sense of routine and order. Pancakes? At six o’clock AT NIGHT? Ridiculous.

When I became a mom and dinner was, as they say, on my plate, I changed my tune. It didn’t hurt that I had a killer pancake and waffle recipe, made from some of the copious sourdough discard created from my bread obsession.

Which came first, the change of heart or the recipe? Hard to say. Either way, this is a great one, and I often double it and freeze the extras just in case someone wants to eat them at an unconventional time, say, before noon. Or at midnight. Right now, anything goes. Enjoy!

Sourdough Pancakes and Waffles

Makes: About 12 pancakes, 3 inches in diameter or 4-5 waffles, about 8 inches in diameter

INGREDIENTS
  • 2/3 cup (150 g) leftover starter
  • 1 cup (240 ml) milk (whole, 2%, or your choice of nut milk)
  • 2 tablespoons (42 g) melted unsalted butter or melted coconut oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup (120 g) flour – white whole wheat, whole wheat, or all-purpose
  • 1 tablespoon (12 g) sugar (white sugar or coconut sugar)
  • 2 teaspoons (10 g) baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon (5 g) fine sea salt
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Add leftover starter, milk, butter, and egg into a large bowl. Whisk well to combine and then add flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt and whisk to thoroughly combine. You can adjust your batter from here—if it’s too thick, you can add more milk if it seems too runny, you can add a little more flour. This will depend on the consistency of your leftover starter, which may vary from batch to batch. If you like buckwheat, you can even add a little in for extra nutrition and that distinctive flavor.
  2. FOR WAFFLES: Preheat your waffle iron. Spray with cooking spray or brush with additional melted butter. Cook until golden brown, 3-5 minutes. Serve warm with butter, maple syrup, and/or fruit of your choice.
  3. FOR PANCAKES: Preheat a griddle or frying pan and spray with cooking spray or brush with butter. Use 1/3 – ½ c scoops and cook until small bubbles form across each pancake. Add mini chocolate chips (my boys’ favorite style!) or blueberries before flipping over. Cook until golden brown. Serve warm with butter and syrup.

To Freeze: Cool completely on a wire rack and freeze in a single layer.

Other Variations: You can add pumpkin and/or banana puree and cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice mixture to this recipe without changing a thing! Add a generous ½ cup of either or a combination of both. For savory waffles, use malt powder instead of sugar and add shredded cheddar cheese and ½ teaspoon of dried herbs into the batter.

I prefer waffles to pancakes, and I highly recommend you serve them hot off the iron with Chicago Maple Bourbon Barrel Aged Syrup. Trust me on this.


11 Amazing Ways to Use Your Sourdough Discard

There’s no getting around it: When you bake sourdough bread, you end up with starter discard. Sometimes, a lot of it. Luckily you can use sourdough discard in recipes here are some favorites.

One traditional way to utilize the stuff is in pancakes or waffles, and some of you even like them for dinner, a phenomenon I have only recently embraced.

I understand I’m in the minority because it seems that everyone else came to love this irrationally timed meal when they were children, but I did not. Even then, it offended my sense of routine and order. Pancakes? At six o’clock AT NIGHT? Ridiculous.

When I became a mom and dinner was, as they say, on my plate, I changed my tune. It didn’t hurt that I had a killer pancake and waffle recipe, made from some of the copious sourdough discard created from my bread obsession.

Which came first, the change of heart or the recipe? Hard to say. Either way, this is a great one, and I often double it and freeze the extras just in case someone wants to eat them at an unconventional time, say, before noon. Or at midnight. Right now, anything goes. Enjoy!

Sourdough Pancakes and Waffles

Makes: About 12 pancakes, 3 inches in diameter or 4-5 waffles, about 8 inches in diameter

INGREDIENTS
  • 2/3 cup (150 g) leftover starter
  • 1 cup (240 ml) milk (whole, 2%, or your choice of nut milk)
  • 2 tablespoons (42 g) melted unsalted butter or melted coconut oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup (120 g) flour – white whole wheat, whole wheat, or all-purpose
  • 1 tablespoon (12 g) sugar (white sugar or coconut sugar)
  • 2 teaspoons (10 g) baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon (5 g) fine sea salt
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Add leftover starter, milk, butter, and egg into a large bowl. Whisk well to combine and then add flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt and whisk to thoroughly combine. You can adjust your batter from here—if it’s too thick, you can add more milk if it seems too runny, you can add a little more flour. This will depend on the consistency of your leftover starter, which may vary from batch to batch. If you like buckwheat, you can even add a little in for extra nutrition and that distinctive flavor.
  2. FOR WAFFLES: Preheat your waffle iron. Spray with cooking spray or brush with additional melted butter. Cook until golden brown, 3-5 minutes. Serve warm with butter, maple syrup, and/or fruit of your choice.
  3. FOR PANCAKES: Preheat a griddle or frying pan and spray with cooking spray or brush with butter. Use 1/3 – ½ c scoops and cook until small bubbles form across each pancake. Add mini chocolate chips (my boys’ favorite style!) or blueberries before flipping over. Cook until golden brown. Serve warm with butter and syrup.

To Freeze: Cool completely on a wire rack and freeze in a single layer.

Other Variations: You can add pumpkin and/or banana puree and cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice mixture to this recipe without changing a thing! Add a generous ½ cup of either or a combination of both. For savory waffles, use malt powder instead of sugar and add shredded cheddar cheese and ½ teaspoon of dried herbs into the batter.

I prefer waffles to pancakes, and I highly recommend you serve them hot off the iron with Chicago Maple Bourbon Barrel Aged Syrup. Trust me on this.


11 Amazing Ways to Use Your Sourdough Discard

There’s no getting around it: When you bake sourdough bread, you end up with starter discard. Sometimes, a lot of it. Luckily you can use sourdough discard in recipes here are some favorites.

One traditional way to utilize the stuff is in pancakes or waffles, and some of you even like them for dinner, a phenomenon I have only recently embraced.

I understand I’m in the minority because it seems that everyone else came to love this irrationally timed meal when they were children, but I did not. Even then, it offended my sense of routine and order. Pancakes? At six o’clock AT NIGHT? Ridiculous.

When I became a mom and dinner was, as they say, on my plate, I changed my tune. It didn’t hurt that I had a killer pancake and waffle recipe, made from some of the copious sourdough discard created from my bread obsession.

Which came first, the change of heart or the recipe? Hard to say. Either way, this is a great one, and I often double it and freeze the extras just in case someone wants to eat them at an unconventional time, say, before noon. Or at midnight. Right now, anything goes. Enjoy!

Sourdough Pancakes and Waffles

Makes: About 12 pancakes, 3 inches in diameter or 4-5 waffles, about 8 inches in diameter

INGREDIENTS
  • 2/3 cup (150 g) leftover starter
  • 1 cup (240 ml) milk (whole, 2%, or your choice of nut milk)
  • 2 tablespoons (42 g) melted unsalted butter or melted coconut oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup (120 g) flour – white whole wheat, whole wheat, or all-purpose
  • 1 tablespoon (12 g) sugar (white sugar or coconut sugar)
  • 2 teaspoons (10 g) baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon (5 g) fine sea salt
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Add leftover starter, milk, butter, and egg into a large bowl. Whisk well to combine and then add flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt and whisk to thoroughly combine. You can adjust your batter from here—if it’s too thick, you can add more milk if it seems too runny, you can add a little more flour. This will depend on the consistency of your leftover starter, which may vary from batch to batch. If you like buckwheat, you can even add a little in for extra nutrition and that distinctive flavor.
  2. FOR WAFFLES: Preheat your waffle iron. Spray with cooking spray or brush with additional melted butter. Cook until golden brown, 3-5 minutes. Serve warm with butter, maple syrup, and/or fruit of your choice.
  3. FOR PANCAKES: Preheat a griddle or frying pan and spray with cooking spray or brush with butter. Use 1/3 – ½ c scoops and cook until small bubbles form across each pancake. Add mini chocolate chips (my boys’ favorite style!) or blueberries before flipping over. Cook until golden brown. Serve warm with butter and syrup.

To Freeze: Cool completely on a wire rack and freeze in a single layer.

Other Variations: You can add pumpkin and/or banana puree and cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice mixture to this recipe without changing a thing! Add a generous ½ cup of either or a combination of both. For savory waffles, use malt powder instead of sugar and add shredded cheddar cheese and ½ teaspoon of dried herbs into the batter.

I prefer waffles to pancakes, and I highly recommend you serve them hot off the iron with Chicago Maple Bourbon Barrel Aged Syrup. Trust me on this.


11 Amazing Ways to Use Your Sourdough Discard

There’s no getting around it: When you bake sourdough bread, you end up with starter discard. Sometimes, a lot of it. Luckily you can use sourdough discard in recipes here are some favorites.

One traditional way to utilize the stuff is in pancakes or waffles, and some of you even like them for dinner, a phenomenon I have only recently embraced.

I understand I’m in the minority because it seems that everyone else came to love this irrationally timed meal when they were children, but I did not. Even then, it offended my sense of routine and order. Pancakes? At six o’clock AT NIGHT? Ridiculous.

When I became a mom and dinner was, as they say, on my plate, I changed my tune. It didn’t hurt that I had a killer pancake and waffle recipe, made from some of the copious sourdough discard created from my bread obsession.

Which came first, the change of heart or the recipe? Hard to say. Either way, this is a great one, and I often double it and freeze the extras just in case someone wants to eat them at an unconventional time, say, before noon. Or at midnight. Right now, anything goes. Enjoy!

Sourdough Pancakes and Waffles

Makes: About 12 pancakes, 3 inches in diameter or 4-5 waffles, about 8 inches in diameter

INGREDIENTS
  • 2/3 cup (150 g) leftover starter
  • 1 cup (240 ml) milk (whole, 2%, or your choice of nut milk)
  • 2 tablespoons (42 g) melted unsalted butter or melted coconut oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup (120 g) flour – white whole wheat, whole wheat, or all-purpose
  • 1 tablespoon (12 g) sugar (white sugar or coconut sugar)
  • 2 teaspoons (10 g) baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon (5 g) fine sea salt
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Add leftover starter, milk, butter, and egg into a large bowl. Whisk well to combine and then add flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt and whisk to thoroughly combine. You can adjust your batter from here—if it’s too thick, you can add more milk if it seems too runny, you can add a little more flour. This will depend on the consistency of your leftover starter, which may vary from batch to batch. If you like buckwheat, you can even add a little in for extra nutrition and that distinctive flavor.
  2. FOR WAFFLES: Preheat your waffle iron. Spray with cooking spray or brush with additional melted butter. Cook until golden brown, 3-5 minutes. Serve warm with butter, maple syrup, and/or fruit of your choice.
  3. FOR PANCAKES: Preheat a griddle or frying pan and spray with cooking spray or brush with butter. Use 1/3 – ½ c scoops and cook until small bubbles form across each pancake. Add mini chocolate chips (my boys’ favorite style!) or blueberries before flipping over. Cook until golden brown. Serve warm with butter and syrup.

To Freeze: Cool completely on a wire rack and freeze in a single layer.

Other Variations: You can add pumpkin and/or banana puree and cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice mixture to this recipe without changing a thing! Add a generous ½ cup of either or a combination of both. For savory waffles, use malt powder instead of sugar and add shredded cheddar cheese and ½ teaspoon of dried herbs into the batter.

I prefer waffles to pancakes, and I highly recommend you serve them hot off the iron with Chicago Maple Bourbon Barrel Aged Syrup. Trust me on this.


11 Amazing Ways to Use Your Sourdough Discard

There’s no getting around it: When you bake sourdough bread, you end up with starter discard. Sometimes, a lot of it. Luckily you can use sourdough discard in recipes here are some favorites.

One traditional way to utilize the stuff is in pancakes or waffles, and some of you even like them for dinner, a phenomenon I have only recently embraced.

I understand I’m in the minority because it seems that everyone else came to love this irrationally timed meal when they were children, but I did not. Even then, it offended my sense of routine and order. Pancakes? At six o’clock AT NIGHT? Ridiculous.

When I became a mom and dinner was, as they say, on my plate, I changed my tune. It didn’t hurt that I had a killer pancake and waffle recipe, made from some of the copious sourdough discard created from my bread obsession.

Which came first, the change of heart or the recipe? Hard to say. Either way, this is a great one, and I often double it and freeze the extras just in case someone wants to eat them at an unconventional time, say, before noon. Or at midnight. Right now, anything goes. Enjoy!

Sourdough Pancakes and Waffles

Makes: About 12 pancakes, 3 inches in diameter or 4-5 waffles, about 8 inches in diameter

INGREDIENTS
  • 2/3 cup (150 g) leftover starter
  • 1 cup (240 ml) milk (whole, 2%, or your choice of nut milk)
  • 2 tablespoons (42 g) melted unsalted butter or melted coconut oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup (120 g) flour – white whole wheat, whole wheat, or all-purpose
  • 1 tablespoon (12 g) sugar (white sugar or coconut sugar)
  • 2 teaspoons (10 g) baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon (5 g) fine sea salt
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Add leftover starter, milk, butter, and egg into a large bowl. Whisk well to combine and then add flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt and whisk to thoroughly combine. You can adjust your batter from here—if it’s too thick, you can add more milk if it seems too runny, you can add a little more flour. This will depend on the consistency of your leftover starter, which may vary from batch to batch. If you like buckwheat, you can even add a little in for extra nutrition and that distinctive flavor.
  2. FOR WAFFLES: Preheat your waffle iron. Spray with cooking spray or brush with additional melted butter. Cook until golden brown, 3-5 minutes. Serve warm with butter, maple syrup, and/or fruit of your choice.
  3. FOR PANCAKES: Preheat a griddle or frying pan and spray with cooking spray or brush with butter. Use 1/3 – ½ c scoops and cook until small bubbles form across each pancake. Add mini chocolate chips (my boys’ favorite style!) or blueberries before flipping over. Cook until golden brown. Serve warm with butter and syrup.

To Freeze: Cool completely on a wire rack and freeze in a single layer.

Other Variations: You can add pumpkin and/or banana puree and cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice mixture to this recipe without changing a thing! Add a generous ½ cup of either or a combination of both. For savory waffles, use malt powder instead of sugar and add shredded cheddar cheese and ½ teaspoon of dried herbs into the batter.

I prefer waffles to pancakes, and I highly recommend you serve them hot off the iron with Chicago Maple Bourbon Barrel Aged Syrup. Trust me on this.


11 Amazing Ways to Use Your Sourdough Discard

There’s no getting around it: When you bake sourdough bread, you end up with starter discard. Sometimes, a lot of it. Luckily you can use sourdough discard in recipes here are some favorites.

One traditional way to utilize the stuff is in pancakes or waffles, and some of you even like them for dinner, a phenomenon I have only recently embraced.

I understand I’m in the minority because it seems that everyone else came to love this irrationally timed meal when they were children, but I did not. Even then, it offended my sense of routine and order. Pancakes? At six o’clock AT NIGHT? Ridiculous.

When I became a mom and dinner was, as they say, on my plate, I changed my tune. It didn’t hurt that I had a killer pancake and waffle recipe, made from some of the copious sourdough discard created from my bread obsession.

Which came first, the change of heart or the recipe? Hard to say. Either way, this is a great one, and I often double it and freeze the extras just in case someone wants to eat them at an unconventional time, say, before noon. Or at midnight. Right now, anything goes. Enjoy!

Sourdough Pancakes and Waffles

Makes: About 12 pancakes, 3 inches in diameter or 4-5 waffles, about 8 inches in diameter

INGREDIENTS
  • 2/3 cup (150 g) leftover starter
  • 1 cup (240 ml) milk (whole, 2%, or your choice of nut milk)
  • 2 tablespoons (42 g) melted unsalted butter or melted coconut oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup (120 g) flour – white whole wheat, whole wheat, or all-purpose
  • 1 tablespoon (12 g) sugar (white sugar or coconut sugar)
  • 2 teaspoons (10 g) baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon (5 g) fine sea salt
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Add leftover starter, milk, butter, and egg into a large bowl. Whisk well to combine and then add flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt and whisk to thoroughly combine. You can adjust your batter from here—if it’s too thick, you can add more milk if it seems too runny, you can add a little more flour. This will depend on the consistency of your leftover starter, which may vary from batch to batch. If you like buckwheat, you can even add a little in for extra nutrition and that distinctive flavor.
  2. FOR WAFFLES: Preheat your waffle iron. Spray with cooking spray or brush with additional melted butter. Cook until golden brown, 3-5 minutes. Serve warm with butter, maple syrup, and/or fruit of your choice.
  3. FOR PANCAKES: Preheat a griddle or frying pan and spray with cooking spray or brush with butter. Use 1/3 – ½ c scoops and cook until small bubbles form across each pancake. Add mini chocolate chips (my boys’ favorite style!) or blueberries before flipping over. Cook until golden brown. Serve warm with butter and syrup.

To Freeze: Cool completely on a wire rack and freeze in a single layer.

Other Variations: You can add pumpkin and/or banana puree and cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice mixture to this recipe without changing a thing! Add a generous ½ cup of either or a combination of both. For savory waffles, use malt powder instead of sugar and add shredded cheddar cheese and ½ teaspoon of dried herbs into the batter.

I prefer waffles to pancakes, and I highly recommend you serve them hot off the iron with Chicago Maple Bourbon Barrel Aged Syrup. Trust me on this.


11 Amazing Ways to Use Your Sourdough Discard

There’s no getting around it: When you bake sourdough bread, you end up with starter discard. Sometimes, a lot of it. Luckily you can use sourdough discard in recipes here are some favorites.

One traditional way to utilize the stuff is in pancakes or waffles, and some of you even like them for dinner, a phenomenon I have only recently embraced.

I understand I’m in the minority because it seems that everyone else came to love this irrationally timed meal when they were children, but I did not. Even then, it offended my sense of routine and order. Pancakes? At six o’clock AT NIGHT? Ridiculous.

When I became a mom and dinner was, as they say, on my plate, I changed my tune. It didn’t hurt that I had a killer pancake and waffle recipe, made from some of the copious sourdough discard created from my bread obsession.

Which came first, the change of heart or the recipe? Hard to say. Either way, this is a great one, and I often double it and freeze the extras just in case someone wants to eat them at an unconventional time, say, before noon. Or at midnight. Right now, anything goes. Enjoy!

Sourdough Pancakes and Waffles

Makes: About 12 pancakes, 3 inches in diameter or 4-5 waffles, about 8 inches in diameter

INGREDIENTS
  • 2/3 cup (150 g) leftover starter
  • 1 cup (240 ml) milk (whole, 2%, or your choice of nut milk)
  • 2 tablespoons (42 g) melted unsalted butter or melted coconut oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup (120 g) flour – white whole wheat, whole wheat, or all-purpose
  • 1 tablespoon (12 g) sugar (white sugar or coconut sugar)
  • 2 teaspoons (10 g) baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon (5 g) fine sea salt
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Add leftover starter, milk, butter, and egg into a large bowl. Whisk well to combine and then add flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt and whisk to thoroughly combine. You can adjust your batter from here—if it’s too thick, you can add more milk if it seems too runny, you can add a little more flour. This will depend on the consistency of your leftover starter, which may vary from batch to batch. If you like buckwheat, you can even add a little in for extra nutrition and that distinctive flavor.
  2. FOR WAFFLES: Preheat your waffle iron. Spray with cooking spray or brush with additional melted butter. Cook until golden brown, 3-5 minutes. Serve warm with butter, maple syrup, and/or fruit of your choice.
  3. FOR PANCAKES: Preheat a griddle or frying pan and spray with cooking spray or brush with butter. Use 1/3 – ½ c scoops and cook until small bubbles form across each pancake. Add mini chocolate chips (my boys’ favorite style!) or blueberries before flipping over. Cook until golden brown. Serve warm with butter and syrup.

To Freeze: Cool completely on a wire rack and freeze in a single layer.

Other Variations: You can add pumpkin and/or banana puree and cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice mixture to this recipe without changing a thing! Add a generous ½ cup of either or a combination of both. For savory waffles, use malt powder instead of sugar and add shredded cheddar cheese and ½ teaspoon of dried herbs into the batter.

I prefer waffles to pancakes, and I highly recommend you serve them hot off the iron with Chicago Maple Bourbon Barrel Aged Syrup. Trust me on this.


11 Amazing Ways to Use Your Sourdough Discard

There’s no getting around it: When you bake sourdough bread, you end up with starter discard. Sometimes, a lot of it. Luckily you can use sourdough discard in recipes here are some favorites.

One traditional way to utilize the stuff is in pancakes or waffles, and some of you even like them for dinner, a phenomenon I have only recently embraced.

I understand I’m in the minority because it seems that everyone else came to love this irrationally timed meal when they were children, but I did not. Even then, it offended my sense of routine and order. Pancakes? At six o’clock AT NIGHT? Ridiculous.

When I became a mom and dinner was, as they say, on my plate, I changed my tune. It didn’t hurt that I had a killer pancake and waffle recipe, made from some of the copious sourdough discard created from my bread obsession.

Which came first, the change of heart or the recipe? Hard to say. Either way, this is a great one, and I often double it and freeze the extras just in case someone wants to eat them at an unconventional time, say, before noon. Or at midnight. Right now, anything goes. Enjoy!

Sourdough Pancakes and Waffles

Makes: About 12 pancakes, 3 inches in diameter or 4-5 waffles, about 8 inches in diameter

INGREDIENTS
  • 2/3 cup (150 g) leftover starter
  • 1 cup (240 ml) milk (whole, 2%, or your choice of nut milk)
  • 2 tablespoons (42 g) melted unsalted butter or melted coconut oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup (120 g) flour – white whole wheat, whole wheat, or all-purpose
  • 1 tablespoon (12 g) sugar (white sugar or coconut sugar)
  • 2 teaspoons (10 g) baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon (5 g) fine sea salt
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Add leftover starter, milk, butter, and egg into a large bowl. Whisk well to combine and then add flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt and whisk to thoroughly combine. You can adjust your batter from here—if it’s too thick, you can add more milk if it seems too runny, you can add a little more flour. This will depend on the consistency of your leftover starter, which may vary from batch to batch. If you like buckwheat, you can even add a little in for extra nutrition and that distinctive flavor.
  2. FOR WAFFLES: Preheat your waffle iron. Spray with cooking spray or brush with additional melted butter. Cook until golden brown, 3-5 minutes. Serve warm with butter, maple syrup, and/or fruit of your choice.
  3. FOR PANCAKES: Preheat a griddle or frying pan and spray with cooking spray or brush with butter. Use 1/3 – ½ c scoops and cook until small bubbles form across each pancake. Add mini chocolate chips (my boys’ favorite style!) or blueberries before flipping over. Cook until golden brown. Serve warm with butter and syrup.

To Freeze: Cool completely on a wire rack and freeze in a single layer.

Other Variations: You can add pumpkin and/or banana puree and cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice mixture to this recipe without changing a thing! Add a generous ½ cup of either or a combination of both. For savory waffles, use malt powder instead of sugar and add shredded cheddar cheese and ½ teaspoon of dried herbs into the batter.

I prefer waffles to pancakes, and I highly recommend you serve them hot off the iron with Chicago Maple Bourbon Barrel Aged Syrup. Trust me on this.


11 Amazing Ways to Use Your Sourdough Discard

There’s no getting around it: When you bake sourdough bread, you end up with starter discard. Sometimes, a lot of it. Luckily you can use sourdough discard in recipes here are some favorites.

One traditional way to utilize the stuff is in pancakes or waffles, and some of you even like them for dinner, a phenomenon I have only recently embraced.

I understand I’m in the minority because it seems that everyone else came to love this irrationally timed meal when they were children, but I did not. Even then, it offended my sense of routine and order. Pancakes? At six o’clock AT NIGHT? Ridiculous.

When I became a mom and dinner was, as they say, on my plate, I changed my tune. It didn’t hurt that I had a killer pancake and waffle recipe, made from some of the copious sourdough discard created from my bread obsession.

Which came first, the change of heart or the recipe? Hard to say. Either way, this is a great one, and I often double it and freeze the extras just in case someone wants to eat them at an unconventional time, say, before noon. Or at midnight. Right now, anything goes. Enjoy!

Sourdough Pancakes and Waffles

Makes: About 12 pancakes, 3 inches in diameter or 4-5 waffles, about 8 inches in diameter

INGREDIENTS
  • 2/3 cup (150 g) leftover starter
  • 1 cup (240 ml) milk (whole, 2%, or your choice of nut milk)
  • 2 tablespoons (42 g) melted unsalted butter or melted coconut oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cup (120 g) flour – white whole wheat, whole wheat, or all-purpose
  • 1 tablespoon (12 g) sugar (white sugar or coconut sugar)
  • 2 teaspoons (10 g) baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon (5 g) fine sea salt
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Add leftover starter, milk, butter, and egg into a large bowl. Whisk well to combine and then add flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt and whisk to thoroughly combine. You can adjust your batter from here—if it’s too thick, you can add more milk if it seems too runny, you can add a little more flour. This will depend on the consistency of your leftover starter, which may vary from batch to batch. If you like buckwheat, you can even add a little in for extra nutrition and that distinctive flavor.
  2. FOR WAFFLES: Preheat your waffle iron. Spray with cooking spray or brush with additional melted butter. Cook until golden brown, 3-5 minutes. Serve warm with butter, maple syrup, and/or fruit of your choice.
  3. FOR PANCAKES: Preheat a griddle or frying pan and spray with cooking spray or brush with butter. Use 1/3 – ½ c scoops and cook until small bubbles form across each pancake. Add mini chocolate chips (my boys’ favorite style!) or blueberries before flipping over. Cook until golden brown. Serve warm with butter and syrup.

To Freeze: Cool completely on a wire rack and freeze in a single layer.

Other Variations: You can add pumpkin and/or banana puree and cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice mixture to this recipe without changing a thing! Add a generous ½ cup of either or a combination of both. For savory waffles, use malt powder instead of sugar and add shredded cheddar cheese and ½ teaspoon of dried herbs into the batter.

I prefer waffles to pancakes, and I highly recommend you serve them hot off the iron with Chicago Maple Bourbon Barrel Aged Syrup. Trust me on this.


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